Hutton said: The past history of our globe must be explained by what can be seen to be happening now. Thinking biblically, we can see that the global flood in Genesis 6–8 would wipe away the concept of millions of years, for this Flood would explain massive amounts of fossil layers.

The age of the earth can be estimated by taking the first five days of creation (from earth’s creation to Adam), then following the genealogies from Adam to Abraham in Genesis 5 and 11, then adding in the time from Abraham to today.

Adam was created on day 6, so there were five days before him. So a simple calculation is: At this point, the first five days are negligible.

Under the entry “creation,” Young’s Analytical Concordance of the Bible9 lists William Hales’s accumulation of dates of creation from many cultures, and in most cases Hales says which authority gave the date. Historian Bill Cooper’s research in After the Flood provides intriguing dates from several ancient cultures.10 The first is that of the Anglo-Saxons, whose history has 5,200 years from creation to Christ, according to the Laud and Parker Chronicles. for creation, which is surprisingly close to Ussher and Jones!

Cooper’s research also indicated that Nennius’s record of the ancient British history has 5,228 years from creation to Christ. Even the Mayans had a date for the Flood of 3113 B. This meticulous work of many historians should not be ignored.

It confirms that the Bible’s history is giving us the true age of the creation.

Today, secular geologists will allow some catastrophic events into their thinking as an explanation for what they see in the rocks.

Smith and Cuvier believed untold ages were needed for the formation of rock layers. No powers are to be employed that are not natural to the globe, no action to be admitted except those of which we know the principle.12 This viewpoint is called naturalistic uniformitarianism, and it excludes any major catastrophes such as Noah’s flood.

Hutton said he could see no geological evidence of a beginning of the earth; and building on Hutton’s thinking, Lyell advocated “millions of years.” From these men and others came the consensus view that the geologic layers were laid down slowly over long periods of time based on the rates at which we see them accumulating today. Though some, such as Cuvier and Smith, believed in multiple catastrophes separated by long periods of time, the uniformitarian concept became the ruling dogma in geology.

Their dates of only thousands of years are good support for the biblical date of about 6,000 years, but not for billions of years. The approximate 6,000-year age for the earth was challenged only rather recently, beginning in the late 18th century.

These opponents of the biblical chronology essentially left God out of the picture.

Three of the old-earth advocates included Comte de Buffon, who thought the earth was at least 75,000 years old.