The oldest meteorites ever dated in the Solar System are 4,56 billion years old, the oldest minerals on Earth are 4,4 billion years old, and the oldest rocks on Earth are 4 billion years old.

based upon radiometric dating the age of the earth is-67based upon radiometric dating the age of the earth is-17

The scientific disagreements highlighted by sceptics are “usually close to the margin of error … ” Until recently, only large scientific laboratories could afford mass spectrometers, the principal tool used to measure dates of rock samples.

But recently the prices of these devices have dropped to levels that even amateur meteorite hunters and others can afford.

But, much to the consternation of scientists, young-Earth creationism, which holds Earth is only about 6,000 years old, continues to be promoted in some quarters, and remains very popular with the public, especially in the United States.

A 2010 Gallup poll found 40% of Americans believe that “God created humans in their present form within the last 10,000 years”.

A 2009 poll found 39% agreed that “God created the universe, the earth, the sun, moon, stars, plants, animals and the first two people within the past 10,000 years”.

(By contrast, and more representative of OECD countries, only about half as many Canadians espouse such beliefs.) Such notions, of course, differ vastly to the findings of modern science, which pegs the age of the earth at 4.56 billion years, and the age of the universe at 13.75 billion years.Indeed, there is no known physical phenomenon that can yield consistent results in many thousands of measurements, year after year, except one: the isotopic decay in these geological specimens, measured by radiometric dating.As biologist Kenneth Miller observed: “The consistency of [radiometric] data …Will sceptics of old-Earth geology wait until mass spectrometers are in every home before finally conceding that the earth is more than 6,000 years old?Radiometric dating, as with any other experimental discipline, is subject to a variety of errors, ranging from human error to rare anomalies resulting from highly unusual natural circumstances. Bailey does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.