Pottery kilns have also been unearthed at nearby Barton Seagrave and Boughton.

Excavations in the early 20th century either side of Stamford road (A43), near the site of the former Prime Cut factory (now the Warren public house), revealed an extensive early Saxon burial site, consisting of at least a hundred cremation urns dating to the 5th century AD.

Kettering is a town in Northamptonshire, England, about 81 miles (130 km) north of London and 15 miles (24 km) from Northampton.

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Many large homes in both the Headlands and Rockingham Road were built for factory owners, while terraced streets provided accommodation for the workers. William Carey, born in 1761 at Paulerspury, spent his early life in Kettering before leaving for India as a missionary in 1793.

The industry has markedly declined since the 1970s, large footwear-manufacturers such as Dolcis, Freeman, Hardy and Willis, Frank Wright and Timpsons, having left the town or closed down in the face of stiff overseas competition, while others have outsourced their production to lower-cost countries. Carey Mission House and Carey Street were named after him.

By the 7th century the lands that would eventually become Northamptonshire formed part of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia.

From about 889 the Kettering area, along with much of Northamptonshire (and at one point almost all of England except for Athelney marsh in Somerset), was conquered by the Danes and became part of the Danelaw, with the ancient trackway of Watling Street serving as the border, until being recaptured by the English under the Wessex king Edward the Elder, son of Alfred the Great, in 917.

Kettering is dominated by the crocketed spire of about 180 feet (55 m) of the Parish church of SS Peter and Paul.

Little is known of the origins of the church, its first known priest becoming rector in 1219-20.

Like most of what later became Northamptonshire, from early in the 1st century BC the Kettering area became part of the territory of the Catuvellauni, a Belgic tribe, the Northamptonshire area forming their most northerly possession.

The Catuvellauni were in turn conquered by the Romans in 43 AD.

Approximately 40-50 local men are said to have been killed and the ringleaders hanged, drawn and quartered.