Significant numbers of teens (15-18) are experiencing emotional and mental abuse as well as violence in their dating relationships; this is even more prevalent among teens that have had sex by the age of 14. commissioned Teenage Research Unlimited (TRU) to conduct quantitative research among tweens (ages 11-14), parents of tweens, and teens (ages 15-18) who have been in a relationship.

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A gender gap remains on how serious the issue is among men and women.

75% of young women think the issue is "extremely serious" compared to 57% of young men, thus demonstrating the importance of Lifetime's campaign, in collaboration with ESPN and others, to reach both women and men.

They carry on these bullying behaviors to dating, the next peer relationship in which they have an emotional investment.

More than three-fourths of people in the survey -- 78 percent -- reported being pushed or shoved by a sibling, while nearly as many -- 77 percent -- said they had pushed or shoved a sibling.

This same survey found that: According to a February 2005 Lifetime Television survey of 600 women and men, ages 16-24, intimate partner violence has personally touched their lives much more so than people have reported in prior studies: Approximately seven in ten women (77%) and men (64%) said they know or have known someone in an abusive relationship and approximately six in ten say that they know a woman who has been sexually assaulted.

This is a dramatic increase from a 1996 survey of adults 18 that found that only 33% of respondents have known a woman in an abusive relationship.Researchers surveyed 8,080 students age 14 and older in 87 New York City public high schools.In a Liz Claiborne Survey released in March 2006, half (50%) of the 1,004 teens ages 13 to 18 surveyed reported they've been in a dating relationship and nearly a third (32%) said they've been in a serious relationship.No differences were found based on race or whether children had grown up in broken homes.The survey of 538 men and women was conducted at a community college in Hillsborough County, Florida.Overall, 9 percent said a sibling had used a knife or gun against them, while nearly 6 percent overall reported using a knife or gun against a sibling.