According to a “Morning Report” segment in the LAT, Barish’s attorney said Barish had finished her screenplay in 1980, one year before Wilhelm finished her novel.The outcome of the lawsuit could not be determined as of the writing of this Note.The film is inconsistent in its naming of the “Wayne Nolan” character.

Eidel cam video-48Eidel cam video-79Eidel cam video-45

The film received mostly positive reviews from critics.

A review by Kirk Ellis in the edition of the HR praised the cast, particularly Arquette who, according to Ellis, “lends the movie its gentle, almost winsome center.” As for Madonna, Ellis remarked that she essentially played herself, however in this context that approach worked well, and said that Seidelman allowed all of the supporting actors to “shine.” Ellis did remark that the first half of the film was slow, writing that “it’s not until Arquette is suddenly stricken with amnesia that the picture finds its true identity,” but that “an attractive, energetic young cast and some witty off-center visual humor make the resultant laughs more than worth the wait.” In his review in the Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert also praised Arquette and Madonna’s performances, but felt the plot was “the weakest part of the movie,” stating, “it’s so unpredictable that, in a way, it’s predictable.” Rosanna Arquette won “Best Actress in a Supporting Role” at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Awards, and received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical.

Although other producers were interested in the script, it was ultimately optioned by Sarah Pillsbury and her producing partner, Midge Sanford, who chose Desperately Seeking Susan to be the first project of their newly formed Sanford/Pillsbury Productions.

About a year later, Pillsbury and Sanford brought Susan Seidelman on board to direct, having been impressed by the success of her first film, Smithereens (1982, see entry), which was made for a budget of only $80,000.

However, according to a Var article from , the distributor was surprised to find that the film proved a hit among the “more sophisticated audience of young adults targeted from the beginning by the filmmakers.” According to the Var article, it was particularly successful in urban areas, including New York City; Boston, MA; Detroit, MI; Washington, D. In 1987, a lawsuit was filed by writer Kate Wilhelm against Leora Barish, Orion Pictures, HBO, Crown Publishers, Inc.

(the company that published the film’s novelization), and novelization author Susan Dworkin, claiming that key plot points of Desperately Seeking Susan had been taken from Wilhelm’s 1982 novel, Oh Susannah!

As a result, Desperately Seeking Susan came to be known as “The Madonna Movie,” and on the first day of filming, Arquette was approached for an autograph by a police officer who mistook her for Madonna, according to a NYT article from .

This reversal of power between the star and the supporting actress created tension on the set, and Arquette admitted in an interview “that she wouldn’t have made the film if she had foreseen Madonna’s meteoric rise and [resulting] truncated shooting schedule,” implemented so that Orion could take advantage of Madonna’s newfound fame.

According to a article in Var , the film “opened at 263 screens nationally and received 11 favorable reviews from New York Critics.” Orion initially invested

(the company that published the film’s novelization), and novelization author Susan Dworkin, claiming that key plot points of Desperately Seeking Susan had been taken from Wilhelm’s 1982 novel, Oh Susannah!As a result, Desperately Seeking Susan came to be known as “The Madonna Movie,” and on the first day of filming, Arquette was approached for an autograph by a police officer who mistook her for Madonna, according to a NYT article from .This reversal of power between the star and the supporting actress created tension on the set, and Arquette admitted in an interview “that she wouldn’t have made the film if she had foreseen Madonna’s meteoric rise and [resulting] truncated shooting schedule,” implemented so that Orion could take advantage of Madonna’s newfound fame.According to a article in Var , the film “opened at 263 screens nationally and received 11 favorable reviews from New York Critics.” Orion initially invested $1.9 million in marketing the film.On , the distributor extended the release to roughly three hundred screens around the country, and on Friday, , “to some 700 screens backed with an additional $2.5 million in advertising coin.” In addition to the more standard means of marketing the film, Orion took advantage of Madonna’s appeal to teenage audiences by “prepar[ing] an ‘Into The Groove’ videoclip with scenes from the [film] [that received] generous play on MTV”; “Into The Groove” played in the background at the nightclub scene wherein Gary and Susan meet for the first time.initially signed on to provide studio support for the film, but, after funding the development of the script, backed out and put the film in turnaround.

||

(the company that published the film’s novelization), and novelization author Susan Dworkin, claiming that key plot points of Desperately Seeking Susan had been taken from Wilhelm’s 1982 novel, Oh Susannah!

As a result, Desperately Seeking Susan came to be known as “The Madonna Movie,” and on the first day of filming, Arquette was approached for an autograph by a police officer who mistook her for Madonna, according to a NYT article from .

This reversal of power between the star and the supporting actress created tension on the set, and Arquette admitted in an interview “that she wouldn’t have made the film if she had foreseen Madonna’s meteoric rise and [resulting] truncated shooting schedule,” implemented so that Orion could take advantage of Madonna’s newfound fame.

According to a article in Var , the film “opened at 263 screens nationally and received 11 favorable reviews from New York Critics.” Orion initially invested $1.9 million in marketing the film.

On , the distributor extended the release to roughly three hundred screens around the country, and on Friday, , “to some 700 screens backed with an additional $2.5 million in advertising coin.” In addition to the more standard means of marketing the film, Orion took advantage of Madonna’s appeal to teenage audiences by “prepar[ing] an ‘Into The Groove’ videoclip with scenes from the [film] [that received] generous play on MTV”; “Into The Groove” played in the background at the nightclub scene wherein Gary and Susan meet for the first time.

initially signed on to provide studio support for the film, but, after funding the development of the script, backed out and put the film in turnaround.

||

(the company that published the film’s novelization), and novelization author Susan Dworkin, claiming that key plot points of Desperately Seeking Susan had been taken from Wilhelm’s 1982 novel, Oh Susannah!

As a result, Desperately Seeking Susan came to be known as “The Madonna Movie,” and on the first day of filming, Arquette was approached for an autograph by a police officer who mistook her for Madonna, according to a NYT article from .

This reversal of power between the star and the supporting actress created tension on the set, and Arquette admitted in an interview “that she wouldn’t have made the film if she had foreseen Madonna’s meteoric rise and [resulting] truncated shooting schedule,” implemented so that Orion could take advantage of Madonna’s newfound fame.

According to a article in Var , the film “opened at 263 screens nationally and received 11 favorable reviews from New York Critics.” Orion initially invested $1.9 million in marketing the film.

.9 million in marketing the film.

On , the distributor extended the release to roughly three hundred screens around the country, and on Friday, , “to some 700 screens backed with an additional .5 million in advertising coin.” In addition to the more standard means of marketing the film, Orion took advantage of Madonna’s appeal to teenage audiences by “prepar[ing] an ‘Into The Groove’ videoclip with scenes from the [film] [that received] generous play on MTV”; “Into The Groove” played in the background at the nightclub scene wherein Gary and Susan meet for the first time.

initially signed on to provide studio support for the film, but, after funding the development of the script, backed out and put the film in turnaround.