In 1748, a regulation defined the correct lengths of the two last fields in the flag as ​ This regulation is still in effect today and thus the legal proportions of the National flag is today 3:1:3 in width and anywhere between 3:1:4.5 and 3:1:5.25 in length.No official nuance definition of "Dannebrog rød" exists.

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Slesvig historian Ulrik Petersen (1656–1735) confirms the presence of such a banner in the cathedral in the early 17th century, and records that it had crumbled away by about 1660.

The size and shape of the civil ensign ("Koffardiflaget") for merchant ships is given in the regulation of June 11, 1748, which says: A red flag with a white cross with no split end. The proportions are thus: 3:1:3 vertically and 3:1:4.5 horizontally.

In a letter dated 22 February 1500 to Oluf Stigsøn, King John describes the battle, but does not mention the loss of an important flag.

In fact, the entire letter gives the impression that the lost battle was of limited importance.

The reason why the kings of Denmark in the 14th century begin displaying the cross banner in their coats of arms is unknown.

Caspar Paludan-Müller (1873) suggested that it may reflect a banner sent by the pope to the Danish king in support of the Baltic countries.

The legend attributing the miraculous origin of the flag to the campaigns of Valdemar II of Denmark (r.

1202–1241) were recorded by Christiern Pedersen and Petrus Olai in the 1520s.

It is obvious that some confusion must have existed regarding the Splitflag.

In 1696 the Admiralty presented the King with a proposal for a standard regulating both size and shape of the Splitflag.

In 1598, Neocorus wrote that the banner captured in 1500 was brought to the church in Wöhrden and hung there for the next 59 years, until it was returned to the Danes as part of the peace settlement in 1559.