Often the prostitution laws are not clear-cut and are subject to interpretation, leading to many legal loopholes.

The legal and social treatment of prostitution differs widely by country.

The degree of enforcement of the anti-prostitution laws vary by country, by region and by city.

In many places there is a big discrepancy between the laws which exist on the books and what happens in practice.

In Sweden, Norway, and Iceland it is illegal to pay for sex, but not to be a prostitute (the client commits a crime, but not the prostitute).

In Eastern Europe, the anti-prostitution laws target the prostitutes, because in these countries prostitution is condemned from a moral\conservative viewpoint.

Europe Sex Guide advises where to find sex, working girls, prostitution, street hookers, brothels, red-light districts, sex shops, prostitutes, erotic massage parlors, strip clubs and escorts in Europe.

Europe encompasses an area of 10,180,000 km (3,930,000 square miles), stretching from Asia to the Atlantic, and from Africa to the Arctic.

Depending on the country, various prostitution related activities may be prohibited (where a specific law forbids such activity), decriminalized (where there is no specific law either forbidding or allowing and regulating the activity), or regulated (where a specific law explicitly allows and regulates the activity if certain conditions are met).

Activities which are subject to the prostitution laws include: selling and buying sexual services, soliciting in public places, running brothels, deriving financial gain from the prostitution of another, offering premises to be used for prostitution etc.

Benelux (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands)These supposedly flat states have a lot to offer the traveller.