Instead, both joined the site after ending long-term relationships and moving to a new city without many friends.They both used the site to meet more people and go on more dates, while using their limited free time efficiently.It only changes the process of discovery," says Mehr in Dan Slater's new book "Love in the Time of Algorithms: What Technology Does to Meeting and Mating." (Slater notes that Mehr was the only dating exec he interviewed who felt this way.)It’s the efficiency of this “process of discovery” that’s appealing to many daters.

The good news is that it’s probably only going to get better with time.

Slater believes that, as the popularity of mobile dating apps increases, sites will learn how to gather more valuable information.

Miller agreed, saying: “And it accomplished what I wanted to do, which was go on a lot of dates."While online dating sites give people another tool to find potential mates, the dates themselves are not very different, other than maybe knowing a bit more about the other person before officially meeting.

“It’s no different than if you meet someone on the street.

Experts say online dating sites see a huge traffic increase between Christmas and Valentine’s Day.

With the number of visitors these sites get each month, that increase is pretty significant: Some current estimates report between 10.5 and 23.8 million unique visitors per month for two major dating sites.

It doesn’t help that these algorithms are closely guarded trade secrets.

The majority of the surveys, studies, and reports evaluating online dating sites’ efficacy are paid for by the companies themselves, leading to some possibility for biased results.

“I think there is a possibility [that these algorithms] could evolve to better predict long-term compatibility.

There’s just a disconnect between what social science says is actually possible, and what the sites say they can do,” said Slater.

Research suggests that, while it is possible to predict whether two people could enjoy spending time together in the short term, it’s (nearly) impossible to scientifically match two people for long-term compatibility.