They risk seriously altering the result of the test.The “Old Wood Problem” is the last flaw of radiocarbon dating that will be elaborated upon here.Since trees can have a lifespan of hundreds of years, its date of death might not even be relatively close to the date the archaeologists are looking for.

In last Tuesday’s lecture, radiocarbon dating was covered briefly.

It is an essential technology that is heavily involved in archaeology and should be explored in greater depth.

They have made a concerted effort to disprove radiometric dating by subjecting radioactive atoms to extreme temperatures, extreme pressures, and a variety of electromagnetic variations.

To date, however, no change in the rate of decay of any geologically significant radioactive isotope has been discovered.

Cosmic rays and changes in Earth’s climate can cause irregularities in the amount of Carbon-14 in the atmosphere.

Humans began making an impact during the Industrial Revolution.

Despite its overuse and misrepresentation in the media, it is nonetheless extremely valuable.

This process has seriously assisted archaeologists in their research, excavations, and scholarly studies.

The isotope decreased by a small fraction due to the combustion of fossil fuels, among other factors.

However, the quantity of Carbon-14 was nearly doubled in the ’50s and ’60s because of the atomic bomb testings in those decades.

As the lecture detailed, it is only accurate from about 62,000 years ago to 1,200 A. There is a sizable amount of time before and after that period that cannot be investigated using this method.