A man calling himself "John" messaged her and through daily phone calls and messages on Facebook, he gained her trust.He spoke with what she thought was a British accent and his picture on Facebook portrayed a nice-looking man with graying hair and a beard.

scam adult dating sites-79

The victims reported collective losses of $50.4 million, which is likely only a fraction of the actual losses since many victims are too embarrassed to file a report, the FBI said.

About 70% of the victims were female; more than half were women 40 years or older.

But as he continued to push for money, Best realized something was off. but who says they're stuck outside of the country and in need of money is a popular ploy among scammers. Some even claim they need money for medical expenses from combat injuries. "We cannot stress enough that people need to stop sending money to persons they meet on the Internet and claim to be in the U. military," Chris Grey, the Army CID's spokesman said in a statement.

She searched Web forums, eventually finding another woman's story of a scammer with the same name. Mingle2, the dating site, did not respond to requests for comment. And in recent months, the International Crime Complaint Center has warned of a new dating extortion scam where scammers bait members of online dating sites into intimate conversations, then threaten to expose them if they don't pay up.

Then she received a nearly $1,000 phone bill from calling the phone number he had said wouldn't charge her. number Best reached him at revealed the number was no longer in service and was hosted by Magic Jack, an Internet-based phone service that allows people anywhere in the world to make unlimited calls from a U. Shortly after the conversations, victims are provided links to a website where their names, photos and telephone numbers are posted, along with the option to view the sexual conversations for $9.

CNNMoney's attempts to reach "John" on his international phone number provided by Best revealed that it was based out of Nigeria -- a hotbed for online scams -- and has since been disconnected. Victims are then prompted to pay to have their name removed from the site.Is it populated entirely by perverted sexual deviants, serial killers, prostitutes and scammers as rumors insist?Or can two regular people really make the connection that the section's name suggests?Ultimately, only the "sweet and normal" was successful, even though very few posts by women had that same tone (more on that later). Most were scams, some were men, some were prostitutes, and just one was legit.All the responses I got from real people on my first day weren't from women — they were from men.Following that, I interviewed two women to learn how they used the site successfully for their own fulfillment.