Judaism maintains that the righteous of all nations have a place in the world to come.

This has been the majority rule since the days of the Talmud.

I once received a message from a man who told me that many Jews do not like gentiles.

According to traditional Judaism, G-d gave Noah and his family seven commandments to observe when he saved them from the flood.

These commandments, referred to as the Noahic or Noahide commandments, are inferred from Genesis Ch.

The 613 mitzvot of the Torah, on the other hand, are only binding on the descendants of those who accepted the commandments at Sinai and upon those who take on the yoke of the commandments voluntarily (by conversion).

In addition, the Noahic commandments are applied more leniently to non-Jews than the corresponding commandments are to Jews, because non-Jews do not have the benefit of Oral Torah to guide them in interpreting the laws.

Any non-Jew who follows these laws has a place in the world to come.

The Noahic commandments are binding on all people, because all people are descended from Noah and his family.

I explained that these people did not disapprove of him because he was Christian; they disapproved of him because he was a Christian dating a Jew, which is another issue altogether.

Traditional Judaism does not permit interfaith marriages.

Both terms can be used in a less serious, more joking way, but in general they should be used with caution.