In practice the latter law was considered only to apply to males.The media, the church, and social commentators started to express concerns about prostitution which was labelled as The Great Social Evil.

Around this time, sexual acts started to be moved from civil law (largely with fines) to criminal law.

For instance, in one part of Mediaeval law, the Frostathing Law, it is stated, "If a woman lies with a man whom she is not allowed to possess, she owes a fine of three marks, just as he does with whom she lies".

Amongst these were "societies for the defense of moral standards", concerned inter alia with prostitution and the government's failure to deal with it. 13) Brothels were eventually prohibited in Norway in 1887 as part of a pan-European moral reform campaign of Abolitionism that replaced Regulationism and was supposed to end prostitution.

The change in the Penal Code in 1902 did not, however, mean that prostitution was more tolerated by society.

Immigration Act It is for foreigners to work as prostitutes in Norway, because prostitution is not considered legal work.

Section 27 states that foreigners can be deported for breaches of the peace.

Any person who a) makes arrangements for such exploitation or inducement as is mentioned in the first paragraph by procuring, transporting or receiving the person concerned, b) in any other way aids and abets such exploitation or inducement, or c) provides payment or any other advantage in order to obtain consent to such exploitation from any person who is in a position of authority over the aggrieved party, or who receives such payment or other advantage shall be liable to the same penalty.

Any person who commits an act referred to in the first or second paragraph against a person who is under the age of 18 shall be liable to a penalty independently of any use of force or threats, abuse of a person’s vulnerability, or other improper conduct.

This form of regulation first appeared in Bergen, then the largest Norwegian municipality, in 1816, in (what is now known as) Oslo in 1840, and Trondheim in 1844.