The city has a long history as a strategic military and transportation point.

The largest Navy base in the world, Naval Station Norfolk, is located in Norfolk along with one of NATO's two Strategic Command headquarters.

After persuading 105 people to settle in the colony, Adam Thoroughgood (who had immigrated to Virginia in 1622 from King's Lynn, Norfolk, England) was granted a large land holding, through the head rights system, along the Lynnhaven River in 1636.

Dunmore secured small victories at Norfolk but was forced into exile by the American rebels, commanded by Colonel Woodford.

His departure brought an end to more than 168 years of British colonial rule in Virginia.

In part because of its merchants' numerous trading ties with other parts of the British Empire, Norfolk served as a strong base of Loyalist support during the early part of the American Revolution.

After fleeing the colonial capital of Williamsburg, Lord Dunmore, the Royal Governor of Virginia, tried to reestablish control of the colony from Norfolk.

Virginia made some attempts to phase out slavery, and manumissions had increased in the first two decades after the war.

Thomas Jefferson Randolph gained passage of an 1832 resolution for gradual abolition in the state, but by that time, increased demand from development in the Deep South created a large internal market for slavery.

These formed the basis for colonial representative government in the newly minted House of Burgesses.

What would become Norfolk was put under the Elizabeth Cittie incorporation.

The patriots destroyed the remaining buildings for strategic reasons in February.