The good news is: there are a lot of single people in America. But how are your friends finding relationships beyond a Netflix subscription? As more people are becoming comfortable using online dating sites, it's quite possible your chances of finding your match are only a few clicks away. Here are 10 online dating statistics you should know: With so many dating websites and apps out there, it's now normal to use online dating to meet someone.There are 40 million Americans using online dating websites and those users range from young to old.In total, nearly half of all of those surveyed, ages 18 to 49 — and 53% of millennials — thought marriage vows should be renewed, and nearly 40% said they believed the “till death do us part” vow should be abolished. Unions you can test and deglitch, work out kinks or simply abandon course without consequence.

50% of New York state residents are single, and the city has the most users on e Harmony.

On the contrast, there are a lower number of users in Idaho, where 60% of the population is married.

It’s not so unlike the setup described by a young writer in a Modern Love column in the New York last month, about how she overcomes “marriage anxiety” by renewing her vows with her husband every year like clockwork. Not all of our marriages will work, no — but when they do, they’ll work better than at any other time in history, say scholars.

“I think people are indeed trying to avoid failure,” says Andrew Cherlin, the author of . And when they don’t, why not simply avoid the hassle of a drawn-out divorce?

Photo after photo of your friend's new boyfriend, your sister's kids and engagement statuses from those high school sweethearts you grew up with.

You roll your eyes and move on but you might also catch yourself wondering why you're single, and when you're going to find your match. population consisted of single adults, which has increased from 48% in 2011.

We feel less bound to tradition as a whole (no bouquet tosses here).

And while we have among the highest standards when it comes to a partner — we want somebody who can be a best friend, a business partner, a soul mate — we are a generation that is overwhelmed by options, in everything from college and first jobs to who we should choose for a partner.

Scholars have observed for some time that attitudes toward divorce have become more favorable over the past decade. We are a generation raised on a wedding industry that could fund a small nation, but marriages that end before the ink has dried.

Millennials in particular are more likely to view divorce as a good solution to matrimonial strife, according to the sociologist Philip Cohen — and more likely to believe it should be easier to obtain. (As one 29-year-old survey respondent put it: “We don’t trust that institution.”) We are also less religious than any other generation, meaning we don’t enter (or stay) committed simply for God.

You could say I beta-tested my relationship.​ It began with a platform migration ​(a cross-country move) and a bandwidth challenge (cohabitation in a 450-sq.-ft. There was a false start (botched marriage proposal). We tried to take the product public before we were ready (I wrote about our relationship in ). They found all sorts of things: among them, that people cheat on the Internet (uh huh), that young people don’t think their relationships are like their parents’ (of course), and that everyone seems to have taken to the term of millennials (43%, and higher among the youngest subset) said they would support a marriage model that involved a two-year trial — at which point the union could be either formalized or dissolved, no divorce or paperwork required.