It is estimated to require four hours of class time, including approximately one hour total of occasional instruction and explanation from the teacher and two hours of group (team) and individual activities by the students, plus one hour of discussion among students within the working groups.Explore this link for additional information on the topics covered in this lesson: This activity will help students to have a better understanding of the basic principles used to determine the age of rocks and fossils. Objectives of this activity are: 1) To have students determine relative age of a geologically complex area.It wasn't until well into the 20th century that enough information had accumulated about the rate of radioactive decay that the age of rocks and fossils in number of years could be determined through radiometric age dating.

4) To demonstrate how the rate of radioactive decay and the buildup of the resulting decay product is used in radiometric dating of rocks. (A single watch or clock for the entire class will do.) 6) Piece of paper marked TIME and indicating either 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 minutes.

5) To use radiometric dating and the principles of determining relative age to show how ages of rocks and fossils can be narrowed even if they cannot be dated radiometrically. 2) Large cup or other container in which M & M's can be shaken. 7) 128 small cards or buttons that may be cut from cardboard or construction paper, preferably with a different color on opposite sides, each marked with "U-235" all on one colored side and "Pb-207" on the opposite side that has some contrasting color.

Principle of cross-cutting relations: Any geologic feature is younger than anything else that it cuts across.

Some elements have forms (called isotopes) with unstable atomic nuclei that have a tendency to change, or decay.

The teacher should tell the students that there are two basic principles used by geologists to determine the sequence of ages of rocks.

They are: Principle of superposition: Younger sedimentary rocks are deposited on top of older sedimentary rocks.

[email protected] "Russia sent millions to Clinton Foundation," the president tweeted quoting the morning program..

As is the often the case, the president is stretching the truth about the Clinton Foundation and money it received: Did the Clinton Foundation receive money from Russia?

Rosatum began buying up shares of Uranium One in 2009 and eventually moved for a majority stake in 2010, which required approval from the Committee on Foreign Investment of the United States, or CFIUS, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.